Rodel Tapaya   
A Fairy's Abode, 2019, acrylic on canvas , 193 x 152 cm

Rodel Tapaya Born 1980 in Montalban, Philippines, Lives and works in Bulacan, Philippines


Rodel Tapaya is one of the most active artists in Southeast Asia today. At the heart of Rodel Tapaya’s work is his ongoing amalgamation of folk narrative and contemporary reality within the framework of memory and history. Utilizing a range of media — from large acrylic on canvasses to an exploration of under-glass painting, traditional crafts, diorama, and drawing — Tapaya filters his observations of the world through folktales and pre-colonial historical research, creating whimsical montages of his characters. Each work has its origin in Tapaya’s reflections on a particular time or place that possesses an enduring resonance, from its correspondence with the formalistic and psychological implication of the grid in his earlier works to protracted ventures which excavate and interpret myth and folk aesthetics. Inherent in the work is a tension between objective investigations of art and the subjectivity of perception and experience, providing his work with an enigma that comes from the impossibility to paint a story without revealing inflections made by the painter’s hand.
Ambera Wellmann, born 1982 in Nova Scotia, Canada; lives and works in Berlin

Ambera Wellmann’s body of work generates and embraces the uncanny, with paintings that amalgamate layers of different nature on the canvas. Her recent focus on porcelain as a feminized material and its mythological and allegorical power feels firmly contemporary and inherently historical. Figures dissolve with one another in sexual encounters, in a dynamic existence, rendering the complexity of desire. Approaching the subject of desire from a female perspective, the spectral concoctions of layered images act as a way of understanding the contemporary self. Underneath the expressive surfaces, one
sees the painting’s history shining through the inherited images of sexuality that challenge the vocabulary attributed to womanhood.

Ambera Wellmann’s work has been shown internationally at Montpellier Contemporary (MOCO) (2019, solo); Istanbul Biennial (2019); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2019); MoMA Warsaw (2019), Australian Center for Contemporary Art, Melbourne (2019); Lulu, Mexico City (2019, solo); Projet Pangée, Montreal, (2018, solo); Office Baroque, Brussels (2018); Regional Centre for Contemporary Art, Sète, France (2018); Arsenal Contemporary, New York
(2018); Oakville Galleries, Oakville (2018); Nicodim Gallery, Los Angeles (2018); Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, (2018); Suzanne Biederberg Gallery Amsterdam, (2017, two-person); TrépanierBaer Gallery, Calgary (2016, solo); Dupont Projects Toronto, (2016, solo)
Alicja Kwade born 1979, in Katowice, Poland. She lives and works in Berlin.

Alicja Kwade is a contemporary Berlin-based Polish visual artist. Her sculptures and installations focus on the subjectivity of time and space. Kwade manipulates common materials like wood, glass, and copper through chemical processes to explore the ephemerality of the physical world. Her works often include reflection, repetitive sounds, and inaccurate doubling to create immersive and experiential spaces that beg viewers to question their perception of reality.

In 2017, the artist participated at the 57th Venice Biennale Vive Arte Viva showcasing her cosmological work, Pars Pro Toto (2017). Kwade was selected for the 2019 Roof Garden Commission for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the seventh commissioned piece for the rooftop, following Huma Bhabha’s We Come in Piece (2018) and Cornelia Parker’s Transitional Object (PsychoBarn) (2016). The piece, titled ParaPivot, is the artist’s first solo exhibition at a museum in the US and comprises of two large steel sculptures that intersect and hold nine stones, sourced from around the world, that resemble planets. Her works can be found in the collections of Centre Pompidou, Paris, France, LACMA, Los Angeles, and Frankfurter Kunstverein, among others.
Lena Marie Emrich born 1991 Göttingen, lives and works in Berlin

In her work, Lena Marie Emrich focuses on the marginal and the social - both topics that are key elements in her artistic practice. Car tuning races, abandoned airports, arenas, hip-hop videos – all these are cultural references that nourish her multidisciplinary practice. Emrich interweaves performance, documentation and sculpture and sheds light on the characteristics of these unique communities. Her works tell of the encounter between supposedly rigid everyday objects and human longings, and conserve them in a simple formal language.
Del Kathryn Barton, born 1972 in Sydney, Australia. Lives and works in Sydney, Australia.

Del Kathryn Barton is widely recognised as one of Australia's leading figurative painters of her generation. Barton graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the College of Fine Arts at the University of New South Wales in 1993, where she was subsequently appointed as lecturer in drawing. Barton’s decorative, highly detailed paintings are known for their vibrant, figurative imagery – combining traditional painting techniques with contemporary design and illustrative styles. Barton’s pictures present a world where everything is fecund and alive. No part of the picture plane is without adornment, and no figure or
creature is less charmed than any other.

She is the only woman to have twice won the prestigious Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2008, 2013) and in 2017 she had her first major retrospective, ‘The Highway is a Disco’ at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Recent solo exhibitions include "r u a bunny?" albertz benda, New York (2017); Del Kathryn Barton: The Nightingale and the Rose, The Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne, Australia (2016); and the highway is a disco, ARNDT Gallery, Singapore (2015).
Timothy Curtis born 1982 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Lives and works in Brooklyn, New York

Timothy Curtis is a self-taught artist whose practice lies at the intersection of drawing and painting. Influenced by his youth in Philadelphia, he utilizes the power, strength, and intuition of bold lines to convey emotion and movement. Curtis’ first solo exhibition at the Hidari Zingaro Gallery, Tokyo was curated by Takashi Murakami in 2017. His work has also been featured at the Brooklyn Museum.
Lippo d'Andrea di Lippo born 1370/1371 and died before 1451 was a Florentine painter, formerly known as Pseudo-Ambrogio di Baldese.

In 1411, Lippo d'Andrea di Lippo joined the Compagnia di San Luca. That same year he was commissioned, along with Niccolò di Pietro Gerini, Ambrogio di Baldese, and Alvaro di Pietro, to paint frescoes on the facade of the Palazzo del Ceppo in Prato. His name has also been connected, although without any documentary proof, to the frescoes in the Nerli Chapel at Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence; the appearance in 1402 of the name 'Lippo' has led to speculations that the creator of the frescoes was indeed Lippo d'Andrea. The other surviving reference to his name comes in 1435-36. That year, Lippo d'Andrea was a member of the group, which included Bicci di Lorenzo, Giovanni dal Ponte, and Rossello di Jacopo Franchi, that was given the task of painting frescoes of the apostles in the tribune chapels of Florence cathedral to celebrate the consecration of the newly built dome by Pope Eugene IV.
Jonathan Lyndon Chase Born 1989, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Lives and works Philadelphia, USA.

Drawing from his everyday experiences, Chase examines the relationship between space and gender as social constructs; the ways in which gender identity is affected by our immediate environment and the dominant societal norms that exist within that space. For Sheets, Chase delves further into this idea of gender performativity, using spatial obscurity as a means of protecting his autobiographical subjects from the trappings of ethno-cultural stereotypes and societal expectations. Fragmented, multi-dimensional characters are placed within abstract and ambiguous backdrops, diminishing existing structures that forcefully define how conventionally masculine and feminine bodies are supposed to function in various settings━ both indoor and outdoor, intimate and public.

Chase has received numerous awards from PAFA and the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, and was the recipient of the 2018 Artist-In-Residence from the Rubell Family Collection Contemporary Arts Foundation, Miami, FL. Chase has been included in exhibitions at the Rubell Family Collection Contemporary Arts Foundation, Miami, FL (2018-2019); Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, VA (2018); California African American Museum, Los Angeles, CA (2017); Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia, PA (2017); and The Bunker, Collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody, Palm Beach, FL (2017). Chase’s work resides in numerous public and private collections throughout the world including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY;
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, FL; High Art Museum, Atlanta, GA; The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY; Buxton Contemporary Art Museum, Melbourne, Australia; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA; The Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia, PA; Rubell Family Collection Contemporary Arts Foundation, Miami, FL; The Hort Collection, New York, NY; and the Beth Rudin DeWoody Collection, Palm Beach, FL.
Absalon (Meir Eshel) born 1964, Ashdod/Israel, died 1993, Paris/France

“It is astonishing that such a short working life produced as concise and complex a body of work as Absalon’s, who died in 1993 at the age of 28. Over the course of just six years, Absalon, who was born in Israel and relocated to Paris in 1987, developed a formal language that fused geometric and spatial considerations with existential questions about the nature of everyday life. His works can be seen both as elegiac meditations on the raw fabric of the quotidian or exercises in the push and pull between freedom and constraint, empty space and solid form.”

Kirsty Bell, in Frieze, 2011
Tony Clark, born 1954, Canberra, Australia. Lives and works in Sicily, Italy and Essen, Germany

Tony Clark made his artistic debut in 1982 and subsequently established his reputation with what he calls the “atmospheric landscape paintings” he is still best known for. Alongside these paintings Clark was experimenting with what he describes as an almost opposite approach: to create works inspired by the decorative arts and a Renaissance tradition of paintings that use pictorial illusion to imitate sculptural relief. In this vein, Clark describes seeing Andrea Mantegna’s painting The Introduction of the Cult of Cybele at Rome (1505–06) in the National Portrait Gallery, London, as critical to the creation of his Chinoiserie series.

“I was becoming immersed in these atmospheric landscape paintings and I wanted to do something that was almost the opposite of that in the way that it was painted. So, if you look at these paintings a lot of them look like relief sculpture.” Clark says.
“The Chinoiserie works were a break-out for me because I wasn’t tied to the atmospheric paintings. I discovered that the colour itself could provide the atmosphere but not in this glazed, illusionistic way.”

For Clark, Chinoiserie presented a way of exploring Australia’s place in the world.
Julius Weigel born 1991, lives in Berlin
Julius Weigel studied sculpture at Weißensee Kunsthochschule, spending his last two semesters at Bezalel in Jerusalem and HGB Leipzig. His work delves into concepts that arrive to film or installation.
Pierre Mukeba born 1998 in Bukavu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, lives in Adelaide, Australia

Moving to South Australia with his family in 2006, he began to paint the extraordinary experiences and people from his childhood. Sometimes themes of brutality, violence, political and economic exploitation emerge and at other times memories of family proliferate.

Pierre Mukeba’s first drawings and paintings were made on bed sheets with indelible brush pens and pencils. Within a few months of commencing an art practice, the Congolese-born artist started to incorporate fabrics sourced from Africa. He works on thin unstretched canvas, on a small table in his bedroom, and yet from such a restricted space he can produce works up to five metres high. His drawn lines are often sewn over while large areas of canvas are left raw.
Douglas Kolk, born in 1963 in Newark, USA, died in 2014


Douglas Kolk’s work revolves around questions of identity, initially in small format drawings and then later in large format works and collages. Figures appear to be restlessly searching for a sense of self. In his drawings, influenced by Pop Art and the current torrent of media images, he emphatically succeeds in expressing human vulnerability, human depth and extreme psychological states. In doing so, in his small and medium formats he works to create a striking, yet restrained visual language through a focused reduction of the forms, lines and colours in which – similar to Raymond Pettibon - sentences, like fragments of thoughts, are integrated so they can be perpetuated by the viewer, enabling them to steer the represented situation in another direction. In the new large format collages and sculptures Kolk’s articulation has become more expressive.
Bernd Koberling born 1938 in Berlin/Germany. He lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Bernd Koberling ranks among the most influential figures in the German art scene. He rose to prominence particularly during the 1980s as “co-father” of the so-called “Neue Wilden”, whose subjective and expressive visual language stood in opposition to the prevailing highly intellectual and conceptual art of the time. Koberling discovered his lifelong theme – landscape – at an early stage in his career, and over the ensuing 50 years has remained true to it, in his continual quest for the quintessence of colour and image.
Andi Fischer born 1987 in Nürnberg, Germany. He lives and works in Berlin.

Fischer’s works focus on the study, investigation, and re-evaluation of a general art history—especially of classical mythological and historical paintings and scenes. The painter attempts to find a new approach to this subject by consciously deconstructing the art of old masters such as Albrecht Dürer and Peter Paul Rubens. The renewed composition of the painting in and of itself—its tradition and transmission to subsequent generations—unfurls a new connotative freedom. This diversification in Fischer’s paintings allows re-observation of artworks’ fixed statements and traditional historiography. At the levels of appearance and interpretation, this permits the viewer an independent understanding gained via unconstrained appraisal. Fischer’s artistic practice treats drawing and painting equally, thereby critiquing traditional hierarchies of art history.

By playing through and exaggerating various modes of museum exhibition—for example in the form of tinted walls, homemade frames, and museum benches—Fischer expands his interrogation of art history methods to include institutional critique and simultaneously provides a commentary on artistic perfectionism.

Text von Marlene A. Schenk


Joseph Beuys, born 1921 in Krefeld, Germany, died 1986 in Düsseldorf, Germany,


Joseph Beuys was a German Fluxus, happening, and performance artist as well as a painter, sculptor, medallist, installation artist, graphic artist, art theorist, and pedagogue.

His extensive work is grounded in concepts of humanism, social philosophy and anthroposophy; it culminates in his "extended definition of art" and the idea of social sculpture as a gesamtkunstwerk, for which he claimed a creative, participatory role in shaping society and politics. His career was characterized by open public debates on a very wide range of subjects including political, environmental, social and long term cultural trends. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of the second half of the 20th century.

In 1967, Beuys founded the German Student Party, one of the numerous political groups that he organized during the next decade. He increasingly became involved in political activities and in 1976 ran for the German Bundestag. In 1978, he was made a member of the Akademie der Kunst, Berlin.

In 1964 he participated for the first time in documenta III in Kassel (1968,1972,1977 and 1982). The 1970s were also marked by numerous exhibitions throughout Europe and the United States. Beuys represented Germany at the Venice Biennale in 1976 and 1980. A retrospective of his work was held at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 1979. He was made a member of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Stockholm, in 1980. During the inauguration of the 1982 Documentain Kassel, Beuys planted the first of 7,000 oak trees; in other cities, he repeated this tree-planting action several times in the following years. In January 1986, in the year of his death, Beuys received the Wilhelm Lehmbruck Prize in Duisburg.
Heinz Mack, born 1931 in Lollar, Germany. He currently lives and works between Mönchengladbach, Germany and Ibiza, Spain.

Heinz Mack is a German artist known as the co-founder of the ZERO movement who worked with light as his primary medium. “For me, light is immaterial,” he explained. “In my case, I prefer to make works that are instruments for light. My sculptures do have a kind of function: of making light visible.” A painter and sculptor, Mack is known for his investigations into luminescence, space, movement, and color, rendered through an array of materials. Together with Otto Piene and later Günther Uecker, ZERO would attract an international roster of artists looking to be unburdened from other artistic movements—among them, Lucio Fontana, Piero Manzoni, and Yves Klein.

The artist’s works are held in the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Tate Gallery in London, and the Calderara Foundation Collection in Milan, among others.
Rainer Fetting, born 1949 in Wilhelmshaven, Germany. Lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Rainer Fetting was one of the co-founders and main protagonists of the Galerie am Moritzplatz in Berlin, founded in the late 1970s by a group of young artists (mainly painters) from the class of Karl Horst Hödicke at the former Berliner Hochschule für Bildende Künste (Berlin Art Academy, today known as Universität der Künste). This group of artists, known as the “Moritzboys” and including, among others, Salomé, Bernd Zimmer, and Helmut Middendorf, subsequently achieved international acclaim as the “Junge Wilde” or “Neue Wilde” in the early 1980s. Fetting is now one of the internationally best known contemporary German artists, having created a large oeuvre of expressive figurative paintings covering many different kinds of subject-matter, as well as many bronze sculptures.

Fetting has participated in numerous influential exhibitions, including a new spirit in painting at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, (1981), Zeitgeist at the Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, (1982), Von hier aus – Zwei Monate deutsche Kunst in Düsseldorf at Messehallen Düsseldorf (1984), An International Survey of Recent Painting and Sculpture at the MoMA, New York, (1988), Refigured Painting – The German Image 1960–1988 at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, (1989) and Portrait Now at the National Portrait Gallery, London, (1993). Recent highlights are Painting Forever! Keilrahmen at the KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin (2013) and permanent exhibition Sammlung Marx at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, Germany (2016). In 2011, the museum Berlinische Galerie honored the artist with an extensive solo exhibition. His work is included in the collections of the Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain, Paris; the Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum for ContemporaryArt, Berlin; and The Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles among many others.
Joseph Beuys, born 1921 in Krefeld, Germany, died 1986 in Düsseldorf, Germany,


Joseph Beuys was a German Fluxus, happening, and performance artist as well as a painter, sculptor, medallist, installation artist, graphic artist, art theorist, and pedagogue.

His extensive work is grounded in concepts of humanism, social philosophy and anthroposophy; it culminates in his "extended definition of art" and the idea of social sculpture as a gesamtkunstwerk, for which he claimed a creative, participatory role in shaping society and politics. His career was characterized by open public debates on a very wide range of subjects including political, environmental, social and long term cultural trends. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of the second half of the 20th century.

In 1967, Beuys founded the German Student Party, one of the numerous political groups that he organized during the next decade. He increasingly became involved in political activities and in 1976 ran for the German Bundestag. In 1978, he was made a member of the Akademie der Kunst, Berlin.

In 1964 he participated for the first time in documenta III in Kassel (1968,1972,1977 and 1982). The 1970s were also marked by numerous exhibitions throughout Europe and the United States. Beuys represented Germany at the Venice Biennale in 1976 and 1980. A retrospective of his work was held at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 1979. He was made a member of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Stockholm, in 1980. During the inauguration of the 1982 Documentain Kassel, Beuys planted the first of 7,000 oak trees; in other cities, he repeated this tree-planting action several times in the following years. In January 1986, in the year of his death, Beuys received the Wilhelm Lehmbruck Prize in Duisburg.
Friedrich Kunath born 1974, in Chemnitz, Germany. He lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

Kunath utilizes a personal style of romantic conceptualism, layering poetic phrases with poignant, often melancholy imagery. The work embraces comedy and pathos, evoking universal feelings of love, hope, longing, and despair. The artist’s personal journey from Germany to Los Angeles plays a key role in his work, incorporating German Romanticism and western popular culture, with still life, cartoon imagery, commercial illustration, nature photography and lyrical references.
Thomas Hirschhorn, born in 1957 in Bern, Switzerland. He lives and works in Paris, France.

He is widely regarded as a leading artist of his generation. Best known for his sculptural constructions produced from disposable mass manufactured goods, Hirschhorn gathers together references and imagery culled from popular media alongside the work of radical theorists such as Gilles Deleuze and Georges Bataille.

Hirschhorn uses everyday and found materials such as plastic sheeting, cardboard, aluminium, packing tape and magazine images to create a dystopian reality. The process of making remains visible and becomes a metaphor for the individual and collective struggle to establish democracy. Implicated in Hirschhorn's work, viewers are obliged to consume and reflect upon that which they may have hitherto been able to ignore in their daily lives. The disparity between the viewer and the bombardment of blown-up imagery reminds us of how distant and removed we can feel when confronted with such imagery.

Hirschhorn has exhibited worldwide and in 2011 was recipient of the ‘8th Kurt Schwitters Award', Sprengel Museum, Hannover, Germany. In the same year he represented Switzerland at the Venice Biennale.


Jules de Balincourt, b 1972 in Paris, France, lives and works in New York, USA

De Balincourt’s painting can be interpreted on several different levels. The image is always an encounter and an invitation to escape, going from pure utopia to dystopia. De Balincourt moves through space, zooming in on details that attract his attention, as what he himself calls “a tourist of globalisation who consumes culture visually and intellectually and conveys or disseminates his personal visions by means of images.” As our gaze moves around these interior images that are like archives of the artist’s visions, it is up to us to constitute an imaginary world based on these selected fragments. We go from abstract elements to figurative details, experiencing a great sense of energy and intense feelings, but where one painting offers harmony, another may slide into chaos.

Jules de Balincourt is interested in the twofold, physical and metaphysical properties of the images that surround us. They are taken from political, social or religious contexts and endowed with a new coherence by the artist, who makes the most of their paradoxes. In some of the canvases, the real is dissolved by pixellisation, evoking another way in which everyday images are appropriated in the digital age.

Miriam Cahn (b.1949, Basel/Switzerland). In her pictorial worlds, the Swiss artist Miriam Cahn pushes for the abolishment of social norms and counters the traditional representation of the female and gender-specific roles. From her early works, which were strongly influenced by feminism, to her later creations, the focus of her painting has been the body. Clearly outlined in its contours, the body nevertheless dissolves into its surroundings. In her thinking, the artist often explores the boundary between inside and outside and what actually constitutes being human. Recurring themes within her work are complex interpersonal relationships, family constellations, women in society as well as refuge, war and violence. The artist pictures humans — irrespective of gender — in all their fragility. Parti-cularly in her later oil paintings, the artist finds new ways of depicting the fragmentation of identity beyond binary gender discourses.
Handiwirman Saputra born in 1975 in Bukittinggi, West Sumatra, Indonesia. He lives and works in Yogyakarta

Handiwirman Saputra is a cofounder and member of Jendela Art Group. He was initially known for his installations of objects and found objects he composed without almost any artistic pretension. The objects – thread, wire, bits of paper, plastic lumps, and hair – were presented practically just as they were. Such anti-aesthetic tendency also appeared in his painting. Only in mid-2000 did he present several surprising works with neatness and fascinating realist techniques. The same thing occurred for his installation work: it showed careful selection of materials and technical rigor. What remained the same was Handiwirman’s view of “beauty”. He searches to offer beauty out of simple things around him.

This means his paintings are an extension of the still-life genre. The thematic emphasis in Handiwirman’s painting is on the issue of perception, the way of seeing. So the object forms seen in his painting are often two-dimensional shapes representations of the objects he himself has made and assembled.

With careful consideration he selects materials and colours to present in
configurations of ‘objects’ that provoke us to associate the perceived forms with things that are familiar in our daily life. Any definitive meanings or conclusive narratives are almost always cancelled out by the vast possibilities of association on the viewers’ part.


Joseph Beuys, born 1921 in Krefeld, Germany, died 1986 in Düsseldorf, Germany,


Joseph Beuys was a German Fluxus, happening, and performance artist as well as a painter, sculptor, medallist, installation artist, graphic artist, art theorist, and pedagogue.

His extensive work is grounded in concepts of humanism, social philosophy and anthroposophy; it culminates in his "extended definition of art" and the idea of social sculpture as a gesamtkunstwerk, for which he claimed a creative, participatory role in shaping society and politics. His career was characterized by open public debates on a very wide range of subjects including political, environmental, social and long term cultural trends. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of the second half of the 20th century.

In 1967, Beuys founded the German Student Party, one of the numerous political groups that he organized during the next decade. He increasingly became involved in political activities and in 1976 ran for the German Bundestag. In 1978, he was made a member of the Akademie der Kunst, Berlin.

In 1964 he participated for the first time in documenta III in Kassel (1968,1972,1977 and 1982). The 1970s were also marked by numerous exhibitions throughout Europe and the United States. Beuys represented Germany at the Venice Biennale in 1976 and 1980. A retrospective of his work was held at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 1979. He was made a member of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Stockholm, in 1980. During the inauguration of the 1982 Documentain Kassel, Beuys planted the first of 7,000 oak trees; in other cities, he repeated this tree-planting action several times in the following years. In January 1986, in the year of his death, Beuys received the Wilhelm Lehmbruck Prize in Duisburg.
George Condo, born 1957, Concord, NH/USA, lives and works in New York

George Condo is recognised as being one of America’s most influential living artists. In a career spanning more than three decades, Condo’s highly original and distinctive body of work has consistently drawn upon art historical traditions and genres, the portrait particularly, in order to hold a mirror up to contemporary social mores.

Solo exhibitions include George Condo at Cycladic Museum, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens (2018); The Way I Think, The Phillips Collection, Washington (2017); Confrontation, Museum Berggruen, Berlin (2016-2017); George Condo. Selections from a Private Collection, The Heydar Aliyev Center, Baku (2016) and Mental States, New Museum, NY (travelling exhibition, 2012- 2011). His works feature in important public and private collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, Barcelona; Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo; and the Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris.

Oska Gutheil, born Ravensburg, 1980, lives and works in Berlin.

The protagonists in Oska Gutheil’s paintings are his personal monsters. They appear in the form of creatures wearing scold’s bridles, hungry crocodile-dinosaur hybrids, cats, skinned bodies, sex-club denizens, worm-eaten chimeras that are half human, half animal, or hordes of affable phalluses. The spaces he composes often resemble surreal mobiles or towers in which these figures, many of them sexless, become Gutheil’s alter egos. His mastery of his medium is on display in paintings executed in vigorous brushwork and raised areas of oil paint that weave in far-flung references to the works of Picasso, Philip Guston, or Hieronymus Bosch. Beyond the political dimension of queer emancipation, Gutheil invites us to explore the world of a vivid puerile imagination, which he deftly contrasts with the arid earnestness of heteronormative lifestyles.
Isa Genzken, born 1948 in Bad Oldesloe, Germany. Lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Isa Genzken has long been considered one of Germany’s most important and influential contemporary artists. Genzken studied at the renowned Kunstakademie Düsseldorf whose faculty at the time included Joseph Beuys, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Benjamin H.D. Buchloh and Gerhard Richter. Since the 1970s, Genzken’s diverse practice has encompassed sculpture, photography, found-object installation, film, drawing and painting. Her work borrows from the aesthetics of Minimalism, punk culture and assemblage art to confront the conditions of human experience in contemporary society and the uneasy social climate of capitalism.

Genzken is best known for her sculptures, gaining attention for her minimalist oriented Hyperbolos and Ellipsoids in the late 70s, and architecturally-inflected works such as her recent epoxy resin windows and skyscraper Columns from the 90s. Genzken’s practice is incredibly wide-ranging, but her work remains dedicated to challenging the viewer’s self-awareness by means of physically altering their perceptions, bringing bodies together in spaces and integrating elements of a mixed media into sculpture.

In 2017, Genzken was awarded the prestigious Goslarer Kaiserring (or Emperor’s Ring) by the city of Goslar, Germany.
George Condo, born 1957, Concord, NH/USA, lives and works in New York

George Condo is recognised as being one of America’s most influential living artists. In a career spanning more than three decades, Condo’s highly original and distinctive body of work has consistently drawn upon art historical traditions and genres, the portrait particularly, in order to hold a mirror up to contemporary social mores.

Solo exhibitions include George Condo at Cycladic Museum, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens (2018); The Way I Think, The Phillips Collection, Washington (2017); Confrontation, Museum Berggruen, Berlin (2016-2017); George Condo. Selections from a Private Collection, The Heydar Aliyev Center, Baku (2016) and Mental States, New Museum, NY (travelling exhibition, 2012- 2011). His works feature in important public and private collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, Barcelona; Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo; and the Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris.

Sophie Calle, born 1953 in Paris, France, lives and works in Malakoff, France.

A notoriously controversial figure of the European scene and one of France’s leading conceptual artists to date, Sophie Calle dedicated her career to the creative exploration of personal relationships, investigating both psychological and emotional terrains of all of us. With such goals in mind, she utilized multimedia works and counts mostly on conceptual and performance-like projects to get her messages from and across the audience. Sophie also relies heavily on photography, film and text as these practices seem to allow her the most speedy approach and the rawest artistic punch. All of Calle’s artworks are meant to provoke a strong emotional reaction in the viewer, as well as to probe the ideas of control, vulnerability, freedom, gender, intimacy and distance in human relationships. Still active to this day, Sophie continues to live and work in the City of Light, tirelessly exploring the themes of intimacy, identity and the relation between the artist and her subjects.

In 2007 she represented France at the 2007 Venice Biennale. Her work has been included in exhibitions at the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey, Mexico, the Bibliothéque nationale de France, Paris; Sprengel Museum, Hannover, Germany; Musée d'Art Moderne de Buenos Aires, Argentina; Musee d'art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; De Appel, Amsterdam; the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London; Hayward Gallery, London; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Serpentine Gallery, London, and Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel. Her work is held in prestigious museum collections that include: Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; Guggenheim; Tate Gallery, London, UK; Los Angeles County Museum, L.A., USA; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection.
Gilbert & George, Gilbert was born in the Dolomites, Italy in 1943 and George was born in Devon, UK in 1942. Both live and work in London, England.

Gilbert & George began creating art together in 1967 when they met at St Martins School of Art, and from the beginning, in their films and ‘LIVING SCULPTURE’ they appeared as figures in their own art. The artists believe that everything is potential subject matter for their art, and they have always addressed social issues, taboos and artistic conventions. Implicit in their art is the idea that an artist’s sacrifice and personal investment is a necessary condition of art. The backdrop and inspiration for much of their art is the East End of London where Gilbert & George have lived and created art for nearly 50 years.

Maria Taniguchiborn 1981 in Dumaguete City, Philippines. She currently lives and works in Manila, Philippines

Maria Taniguchi is best known for her ongoing series of labour-intensive 'brick paintings' that are made of repetitive patterns of grey-black rectangles. For the paintings, which are all untitled and unnumbered, Taniguchi first draws out a grid, then fills one 'brick' at a time over a period of months on the floor of her Manila studio. While the works differ in size, the content—or lack thereof—always remains the same. Yet each painting is slightly unique in its distributions of minor gradations within the grid (some cells are near-black, while others appear as a washed-out grey)—a result of the differing amounts of water and pigment on Taniguchi's brush at any given time. Revealing the hand of the artist and the associated connotations of labour in what at first appears to be mechanically produced, the differing densities are largely unplanned and heighten the illusion of textural space. At a glance, the paintings may resemble the grid structures of densely populated urban spaces or sombre memorial monuments. Taniguchi resists calling the paintings meditative however, and instead considers them more of a record of passing time and a means of regulating her own production.
Hiroshi Sugito born in 1970 in Nagoya, Japan. He lives and works in his hometown of Nagoya, Japan.

Hiroshi Sugito is a contemporary Japanese painter whose work employs themes found in traditional Nihonga paintings. Painted with a light touch, Sugito’s semi-abstract depictions of figures, smoke, and trees have an airy and light-filled quality. Today, the artist’s works are held in the collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo, and the Sammlung Goetz in Munich, among others.
Jannis Kounellis born 1936 in Piraeus, Greece, dies 2017 in Rome

Jannis Kounellis was a Greek performance artist and sculptor associated with the Arte Povera movement. Originally emerging as a painter, Kounellis shifted to making installations he is now widely celebrated for in 1967 during his involvement with Arte Povera, a movement dedicated to attacking the established norms of government, industry, and culture. During this time, he increasingly created works that juxtaposed disparate materials, including stone, cotton, coal, bed frames, and doors.

He went on to study art in Athens and then at the Accademia de Bella Arti in Rome. A prevalent theme in his practice was the incorporation of real life—simulated or otherwise—into spaces of art. This phenomenon can be seen in works where he has installed live birds in cages alongside paintings, sculptures accompanied by the playing of a Bach score, and his reoccurring installations wherein 12 live horses are displayed in galleries or other art spaces. He experienced high levels of success for his work, and participated in prestigious exhibitions including documenta and the Venice Biennale.
Miroslav Tichýborn 1926 in Kyjov, Czech Republic. Tichý died in 2011 in Kyjov, Czech Republic.

Miroslav Tichý was a photographer who from the 1960s until 1985 took thousands of surreptitious pictures of women in his hometown of Kyjov in the Czech Republic, using homemade cameras constructed of cardboard tubes, tin cans and other at-hand materials. Most of his subjects were unaware that they were being photographed. A few struck beauty-pageant poses when they sighted Tichý, perhaps not realizing that the parody of a camera he carried was real.

His soft focus, fleeting glimpses of the women of Kyjov are skewed, spotted and badly printed — flawed by the limitations of his primitive equipment and a series of deliberate processing mistakes meant to add poetic imperfections.

During the Communist regime in Czechoslovakia, Tichý was considered a dissident and was badly treated by the government. His photographs remained largely unknown until an exhibition was held for him in 2004. Tichý did not attend exhibitions, and lived a life of self-sufficiency and freedom from the standards of society.

Bruce Nauman born 1941 in Fort Wayne, IN, USA. He lives and works in Galisteo, NM, USA.

Bruce Nauman is an American Conceptual artist working in a wide array of media that includes neon lights, video, and performance. A central figure of 1970s art and pioneer in the development of Post-Minimal art, Nauman’s greatest contribution is perhaps his self-analytic investigations of the creative mind and its doubts concerning the production of art. “If I was an artist and I was in the studio, then whatever I was doing in the studio must be art,” he once remarked. “At this point, art became more of an activity and less of a product.” His iconic neon sign sculpture Run From Fear – Fun From Rear (1972) demonstrates his ability to play with and expose the difficulties of translating creative thoughts into language or acts.

Nauman studied mathematics at the University of Wisconsin before shifting his focus to art, going on to receive his MFA from the University of California and study under William T. Wiley. The influential artist has participated in the 1977, 1985, 1987, 1991, and 1997 Whitney Biennales, with his work is included in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Tate Modern in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Kunstmuseum in Basel, and many others.
Pablo Picasso born in 1881 in Málaga, Spain. Died 1973 in Mougins, France.



Pablo Picasso was one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. His ingenious use of form, color, and perspective profoundly impacted later generations of painters, including Willem de Kooning and David Hockney.

“There are artists who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are others who, thanks to their art and intelligence, transform a yellow spot into the sun,” he once said. His prodigious talent was cultivated early on by his father the painter Jose Ruíz Blasco. Picasso went on to attend the Royal Academy of San Fernando in Madrid, and lived for a time in Barcelona before settling in Paris in 1904. Immersed in the avant-garde circles of Gertrude Stein, he rapidly transitioned from Neo-Impressionism through the Blue Period and Rose Period, before reaching a culmination in his masterpiece Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907).

Constantly in search of pictorial solutions and in dialogue with his friend Georges Braque, Picasso melded forms he saw in African sculpture with the multiple perspectives he gleaned from Paul Cézanne, to produce Cubism. Not limited to painting, the artist also expressed himself through collage, sculpture, and ceramics. Having been deeply affected by the ongoing Spanish Civil War, Picasso created what is arguably his most overtly political work Guernica (1937), a mural-sized painting depicting carnage with jagged shapes and contrasting grayscale. The artist was prolific up until his death on April 8, 1973 in Mougins, France. Today, his works are held in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tate Gallery in London, the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, as well as institutions devoted solely to his life work, such as the Museo Picasso Málaga, the Museu Picasso in Barcelona, and the Musée National Picasso in Paris.
Bianca Kennedy born 1989, in Leipzig, Germany - lives and works in Berlin, Germany

Bianca Kennedy studied art at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and completed her diploma with a Meisterschüler-degree (2017). Scholarships have brought her to North America, Barcelona, Athens and Tokyo. Kennedy's animations, drawings and site-specific installations were shown at Kunstverein Munich, Kuandu Museum Taipei, C-Gallery Milan and Colombo Art Biennale in Sri Lanka among others. In her analytical stop motion animations she depicts the human abyss and works regularly on photographies and drawing series where she stages self-created miniatures.
She is winner of the TOY Berlin Masers Award 2019.
+#Jerrell Gibbs#+ (born in Baltimore, USA) retraces family memories, examining the origin of his own life by representing intimate and instantly joyous moments. While affirming the multilayered experience of the African-American diaspora, Gibbs plunges the viewer into an immersive experience, the realm of his childhood.

Growing up in Baltimore influenced his perspective of socio-economics, body politics, race, economic disparities and their influence on one another. Through his figurative portraits, Gibbs accentuates conventional representations of black identity by depicting empathy, inviting the possibility for a spiritual connection. The works are adapted from small polaroids, adapted into life-size paintings. The artist draws from revised characters in his own life and narratives such as Charles M. Schulz’s Peanuts, mimicking their playful illustrative style.

Gibbs graduated with an MFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD in 2020. He has exhibited at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, The Galleries at CCBC and The Gallery at Howard University. His work appears in the permanent collection in the Harbor Bank of Maryland and most recently the Columbus Museum of Art.
Bianca Kennedy born 1989, in Leipzig, Germany - lives and works in Berlin, Germany

Bianca Kennedy studied art at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and completed her diploma with a Meisterschüler-degree (2017). Scholarships have brought her to North America, Barcelona, Athens and Tokyo. Kennedy's animations, drawings and site-specific installations were shown at Kunstverein Munich, Kuandu Museum Taipei, C-Gallery Milan and Colombo Art Biennale in Sri Lanka among others. In her analytical stop motion animations she depicts the human abyss and works regularly on photographies and drawing series where she stages self-created miniatures.
She is winner of the TOY Berlin Masers Award 2019.